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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
of religion is understood to be a completely private matter. in the statement by mendelssohn, in connection with france, he said to be a citizen in the streets but a jew at home, but that is not the message you get from the stable of kosher food in philadelphia. it is ok to be a jew in public, too. it is not a matter of expressing to the private. the spirit of freedom is perhaps unique to the united states in the world, but even here, even with that kind of sounding, and even with the words of the first amendment to express that, things have not always been so happy, and especially not always so happy for minorities in america. he was not then chief justice but the man who was going to become chief justice of the supreme court fought on the convention to exclude roman catholics. it was a big fight. he was defeated alternately, -- alternately, but that was an attempt, and it was not long after, and that was a time when catholics constituted less than 1% of the population of the united states and were no threat out all. as larger numbers of roman catholics came to these shores, especially fro
of summer turning to fall ♪ and anything made of paper that's all ♪ that's all ♪ in the shadows of religion some think we find the truth ♪ where innocence is stricken without an ounce of proof ♪ while the wheels of injustice can turn mighty fast ♪ another blood moon of october will silently pass ♪ with words of love in a telephone call ♪ and anything made of paper that's all ♪ that's all that's all
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religions, actual religions and i think that, look, there's ways that people can take days off for their special days. i think though that you're going to be looked at funny if you insist you need halloween off. i think it's insulting if you're a wiccan or a pagans and if you're an atheist or a pagans, if you're celebrating nature, an everyday experience. >> tucker: only a country too rich too long could be this frivolous and silly. the statements from the school, the information about the wiccan and pagans holidays, the statement says, has been in the guide since last fall. keep in mind this is not intended just for faculty, this is an informational guide for anyone across campus. letting you know. >> letting you know which days you can take. >> tucker: and christianity and comes down to-- >> i think that there's a rejection of tradition. i think this is again, not about elevating anyone else, it's about paganses and wiccans used for a political agenda to downgrade what's important to a majority of americans. i think that this is an anti-tradition action. i think paganses and
. >> reporter: and he repackages religion in a very unusual way. he's also a professional rapper, and preaches religion with rhyme. >> sometimes you have to do a little hip-hop, too. >> reporter: during a sermon? >> if need be. ♪ i'm trying to live it like christ ♪ >> reporter: as a rapper around the chicago area, the reverend is known as jay quest. >> what it really does is hopefully lead people into a greater understanding and awareness of themselves and their god. >> reporter: he's been preaching for ten years, he's been rapping professionally for about five years. they don't seem like they go together. but apparently they do. >> i don't think that i rap religion, though. i think that i rap about life, and i rap about the narratives of all of our experiences. i think that's the same thing that sermons are about. >> reporter: sermons and rap, the two have met. frank mathy, abc 7 news. >> whatever it takes. >> whatever gets the message out there is a good thing. so different people respond to different things. i like it. >> especially if you want to get to the younger demographic. that's
that was abandoned, and there's a lot of other religion, the left turned against religion. when it was half of the movement's inspiration and half of the dr. king's magnificent formula of equal souls, equal votes, a foot in the scriptures one foot in the constitution, and the next thing you know, people are turning against the spiritual base of democracy. we misrememberedded the civil war for a century. when i grew up in atlanta; the textbook said it had nothing to do with slavery. we got a lot of sentimental gone with the wind, and to this day, textbooks in history refer to the political movement that overthrew the reconstruction governments after the civil war and restored white supremacy in the south paving the way for segregation, referred, the textbooks refer to the movement as the redeemers. the redeemers redeemed the south. the religious word that in reality was accomplished by terror. terrorism as much as the terrorism that plaged the world that we're attuned to when it's not among us. it turned race -- race has the power of turning our sense of perception upside down. that's the te
summary of that is that i am not arguing for morality, from religion, or from tradition. none of my arguments presuppose anything about the moral status of gay relationships. there are lots of valuable relationships that do not get recognized as marriage by anybody. that cannot be the decisive factor. they do not rely on any particular religious tradition. if they did, it would still leave something to be desired because something i will defend today has been common to religions across time and many cultures. we would still want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating those theologies rather than the other way around. and i am not arguing that because it has always been this way it always should be. another thing is that my argument cannot be answered by appeals to equality. we usually think that this is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict a pool of people eligible for marriage. it is true that from that perspective it looks like marriage is a good thing and should be available on an equal basis. i
then that they get bitter king to guns or religion or antipathy towards people who aren't like them, or anti-immigrant sentiment or antitrade center. as with a toy to explain their frustrations. >> the comments became a big part of the discussion on the left-right culture war. republicans were happy to publicize his comments, but these days they're terrified they might be losing the culture wars on some front, and they may well will. let's look at the grounds on gay marriage. once unthinkable, nine states and the district of columbia have legalized same-sex marriage either by court degree, legislative action or actual popular vote. and now illinois, delaware, and hawaii are also considering legalizing gay marriage, same-sex marriage. and the rights retreat on cultural issues extends to other areas as well. i'm joined by lauren ashburn, found over the daily download and a contributor to the daily beast. oftenly confused with hillary rodham clinton. but not politically. let me talk about this, because you're on the front all the time fighting for same-sex rights and gay rights generally. isn't
of those weird guys. i mean, because i'm not a big fan of organized religion, but i love god. >> hello, marilyn. >> as do the contestants on the the show. we went to atlanta for a casting call where before anything else, would-be players have to pass a 30-question test. >> so here's your quizzes. >> would you be able to name all of the books of the new testament in order? >> matthew, mark, luke, john, romance, first and second, corinthians, galatians and ephesians, philippians, kohl oshians and titus and hebrews, james, first and second peter, first and second third john, june and revelation. ooh! >> we are mission impossible! come on! >> the lord works in mysterious ways. >> go jesus, go jesus, go! >> 300 teams auditioned including the rockin' rabbi two rabbis and a theologian student in upstate new york who did so well they earned a place in the second season. >> think we're putting a lot of pressure on ourselves to represent. we feel like within the old testament we know what we're talking about and we should be able to show that to the rest of the world. >> cain is absolutely right
in that because all so globalization and religion and economics coming together to complicate it. if you are talking about the divisions that cause people to start thinking like enemies, still very much with us. [applause] >> i want to thank taylor branch for being with us tonight. he will be signing books in the library. i want to thank the livingston foundation for sponsoring this lecture and it anybody in california is listening please -- we could really use it. thank you very much. [applause] >> for more information visit the author's website taylor branch.com. >> to take booktv is in savannah, ga. for live coverage of the savannah book festival starting at 10:15 eastern with nobel prize winner and former vice president al gore on the future. 11:thirty-fourth and eighty psychologist heidi squire craft on rule number 2, lessons i've learned in a combat hospital. at 1:30 cnn's chief washington correspondent jake tamper on the war in afghanistan from the outpost. 2:45 presidential historian kevin thomas on ike's glove. at 4:00 pillage a prize-winning historian gerri willis asks why prie
, ensures our freedom of speech and religion and all the rest? i don't think so. i think the american people ensure those rights. anyway. >>> neck, full fication with a twist. a montana gun lobbyist is proposing a new sheriff's first bill which would allow county sheriffs to pick and choose which federal laws they wanted to enforce in their state. if a federal agent arrests someone without stopping in at the sheriff's office first, that agent would be arrested and charged with kidnapping the person they arrested. as gary mar bid told mother jones, the alcohol and tobacco federation might say that we have probable cause to believe that we have this person in the our county who is making firearms who ut a license and the sheriff might say, well, gosh, under the montana firearms freedom act, that's protected activity in montana, so you don't have my permission for this bust. well, this nullification type proposal was cleared by a vote by the state's republican-led house judiciary committee just this week. >>> finally, who do you think really has got the short end of the stick when it comes to t
by their religion, their skin color, their financial status or anything like that, but to accept them for who they are. i'm guilty of having what i like to call the small town complex. coming from a small town, i've got it. but it's where you think your world's only this big and that's how it is because that's what you were taught. i'm 24, and i know that's not the case anymore. but really, i mean, we always do that. we as humans are so fast to judge one another without really getting to know one another for what they are. so i definitely think it's something we could all take, take to and listen to. so anyways, we were stationed in northeastern afghanistan in a place called as jr. man, it's in the kunar province right on the pakistan border. and this is where i would be stationed with lieutenant john sovereign, gunnier is cent -- expubl and doc leighton. doc leighton was a navy corpsman, but they might as well be marines, so i'm going to cull him a -- call him a marine from here on out. [applause] so part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and getting to develop our team. becau
baptist, 11,000 member congregation said christianity is right and a lot of other religions long. he called mormonism a cult. he said unkind things about islam. he's come under a lot of fire about how he talked about gays and lesbians. this is part of the reason why this controversy erupted by tim tebow accepting to speak at the church saying he was there to endorse the pastor. how they express those beliefs are much different and obviously tebow is a much softer in how he talks about his faith. pastor jeffers has been more critical about other faiths when he talks about his own. pastor jeffers has been kind enough to join us on the telephone from dallas. good afternoon. thank you for being with us. >> appreciate you having me. let me just say one thing about your report. you know, when it comes to catholicism i've said publicly there will be millions of catholics who will be in heaven because they trusted in christ the savior. i was talking about theological differences. we're outspoken in our beliefs. it's funny to me that a church like ours that simply says christ is the only way
fellow religion, i want our people out of there. that is not right. i come over to our country and try to kill us. we need to stay over there and fight for our freedom. host: you bring up interesting points. basic idea we have in this country is that we get into wars, but we very rapidly lose the ability to support those wars, political perspective. we saw what happened in vietnam. if desert storm last longer, we would have seen the same thing there. we know what happened with iraqi freedom. you're looking at a nation that can go in, with a superb military capability, which her daughter is a part of, and it can make a lot of differences, but the problem you have is that you have a political situation where we cannot sustain a long- term deployment, 12-13 years in afghanistan over the long term. it has become america's longest war. economically, you look at how that works. the big problem that i have with the drawdown is perhaps related to what your saying -- you have to be very careful about what to tell the enemy. you have to have a negotiating position that gets you from the strength
of organized religion. but i love god. start the clock now. >> reporter: because it really is a game show, there are prizes. winning teams get $20,000 each episode. but there's $100,000 for the tournament champion. all prize money, however, goes to the winning team's charity of choice. [ cheers ] >> having a baby at the age of 90, memaw. just saying. nothing's out of the realm of possibility here. >> reporter: most pastors aren't as funny as foxworthy. he assured us he's not trying to compete in that arena. he knows his limitations. >> when i started hosting "fifth grader," people certainly thought i was smarter than i was, you know. and i would say, hey, if i didn't have the cards -- the shortest show on television. and now i'm doing this and people think, well, this guy has all the spiritual answers in the world. i'm like, no, i'm still the samsame idi idiot. still two decision was drywalling, you know. >> reporter: for "today," harry smith, los angeles. >>> let's head out to the plaza and check the weather from dylan. >> good morning, lester. good morning, everyone. you're from miami?
you go with -- >> as long as we're in the fantasy religion league, i won't with -- i went with soemtier. it would be to be a woman in america, that's not going to happen, but it does speak to some of the issues about how the church needs to open itself up and find herself, puerto rican, grew up in the bronx, has mixed it up in the real world and would be a good thing for whoever is pope. >> angela, who did you come up with? >> not yourself. >> absolutely not. but i think it's important to note there's 150 million catholics in africa and there is a quote that the pope said. he considers africa to be the spiritual lungs of humanity. to that end i seconded cardinal peter turkson who was recently appointed by the pope to head the pontifical council for justice and peace. he is a notable leader, and he is also from ghana. >> pope peter. >> yes, pope peter. >> that's got a nice ring to it, robert costa. >> the new millennium. i think that's a great pick. we'll hear a lot about third world choices, someone outside of italy, maybe outside of europe. if it's not going to be an amer
religious liberty. he wants to define the first amendment, free exercise of religion clause to one hour a week. that's what he wants to do. he is not our friend. >> stephanie: wow. >> that's treason. >> stephanie: i was going to say that sounded a little treasony. the president of the united states is our enemy? the enemy? that's dangerous talk, isn't it? maybe the secret service needs to borrow the giant cartoon paw. [knock at door] >> isn't that the sound the cat made when he was out for the night? >> stephanie: right. >> then the cat will stay out for the night. [knock at door] >> stephanie: that concludes right-wing world. thank god. [ applause ] >> you didn't like that? >> stephanie: no. >> started to turn. >> stephanie: 17 minutes after the hour. you know, we talk about carbonite. how great was that letter i just read the other day. an item t. specialist, someone lost everything in her computer. they called the data recovery company. it will cost $2,000. what could she have done? carbonite for only $59 for the entire year? now everybody in the office has carbonite. you have all of
. people in great distress either find religion or the courts. [laughter] that is okay. we need a road map. what we are really out lying is an ongoing mission. our ideal on both sides, because we are open to all and have a level playing field. the road maps, the clarity of language, and information flows to the ultimate consumers, it is ideal. i love the fact that at the beginning of the creation, there was the thought that information flow passivity in a certain way for a certain population. i love the fact there is one for seniors because information is channeled differently for different priorities in different times. it must reflect our diversity and the delivery of regulation. we are here for the seniors. i see so many coming to the court room see how important that is. >> i wanted to move on to discussing the short term. short-term credit ends up being a death trap for a lot of consumers in a harmful way. that brings us the issue of loans and we have seen the effects. i want to bring in dawn to the conversation. there you are. you have done a lot of work in texas around this issue. m
religion. people are rational. that's not quite true. religious lines in the middle east are critical. i think that once iran goes nuclear, we're going to have a severe sunni-shiite play, and it's seen as a shiite's bomb threatening the sunni dominance in the middle east. we will probably see very close to that, a pakistani nuclear presence, an extended, and pakistan nigh extended tee -- deterrents in saudi arabia. they financed the nuclear program. they have prior agreement with them that if saudi arabia calls for it, they will provide them with nuclear weapons. i doubt that pakistanis will just deliver a bomb. they would probably station elements in the region, and this is going to raise the question regarding, for the first time, second strike capability against india which would complicate the south asian complex. eases cay collation -- escalation risk is higher than ever between the two super powers. it's command and control. we have to address the question of how command and control of nuclear weapons are -- influences deterrents. first of all, questions of custody. in the united s
, such as, for example, religion or os sa fied theorys that aren't based on what actually works but based on a religious ooh ooh ooh fervor. this is not the party of burke. i was teaching burke at columbia this week. my key question to the students is, you've read burke, conservatism. you thought you weren't going to like him. yet most of you hate republicans. what's the difference? >> wait a second -- >> i'm a great admirer of burke. i understand what you're talking about. i think part of the modern challenges of the movement in america was forged in the 1960s, before the great society. so there needs to be a reassessment of how you apply conservative principles to the 21st century. that philosophical is ongoing on. >> the author of the great director of mind. if he's watching, he's losing his mind because i think the whole persuasion of burke, burke is a radical calling your revolution. monar monarchist revolution. his whole point we liberals consider a have this argument, it was good conservatism back in the day. >> burke was in dialogue -- >> exactly, the ones who are no longer in pow
. was there any idea in your mind that he was motivated by religion and-- >> no doubt. in our training in the military. we're taught before a jihadist would perform their act. that's one of the things they say, god is great. that's their motivating piece to give them the imaging to perform any devious act they're going to perform. >> you say you want to make sure that the mistakes that led to this tragedy never happened again. and so what do you want to see happen? >> well, the individuals that were in charge of major hassan when he was at walter reed need to be held accountable, not by a lateral transfer from one department or one division to another. they need to be held accountable by showing dereliction of duty not stepping up and doing his job. the second thing. we need to have better lines of communications between all the federal services, the fbi and others were tracking major hassan and tonight let d 0 d did not let them know. and dod didn't let the fbi or homeland security the issues they were having this guy. >> alisyn: problems. >> tucker: yes, they are. sergeant, thank you
.a. it's the american riviera. >> i love it. get married, food, find religion, all in the same beautiful place. >> i want to die there. >> me too. ♪ >> santa barbara. where the mountains meet the ocean. the sun kisses the sky. and the only thing better than the fine wine is the five-star food. for tens of thousands of tourists every year, their first introduction to santa barbara happens aboard the landshark. part bus, part boat, the landshark starts on the street and ends up in the harbor. >> three, two, one! >> such a picturesque city, allows you to see everything from the land, to the water. check out the sea lions. back on land, santa barbara county features some of the most expensive properties in california, including the exclusive community of montacitto, home to celebrities like oprah winfrey, ellen degeneres, and rob lowe. the number one tourist draw in santa barbara. >> people do meet god here. >> father richard mcmanis is one of 14 brothers who have taken a vow of poverty, chastity, and obedience. you live amongst so much money, wealth, and excessive lifestyle. is there anyt
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)